A Sheerie Gathering
oldpainting:

Hans Holbein dJ - Portrait of Robert Cheseman by petrus.agricola on Flickr.
Hans Holbein dJ - Portrait of Robert Cheseman [1533] - The Hague Mauritshuis

oldpainting:

Hans Holbein dJ - Portrait of Robert Cheseman by petrus.agricola on Flickr.

Hans Holbein dJ - Portrait of Robert Cheseman [1533] - The Hague Mauritshuis

jeannepompadour:

Ladies with fans and lace mantillas by Ignacio Zuloaga (1870-1945)

gdfalksen:

Victorian Men’s Hairstyles & Facial Hair
A collection of Victorian photographs, depicting some of the hairstyles and facial hair fashion of the time, and a few rather unique hair styles like a man with ringlets.

Woman’s Hairstyles
Victorian [x] | Edwardian [x] | 1920’s [x] | 1930’s [x] | WW2 [x]

audreybenjaminsen:

FAIRY

M.O.M. Classification: XX

"The fairy is a small and decorative beast of little intelligence. Often used or conjured by wizards for decoration, the fairy generally inhabits woodlands or glades. Ranging in height from one to five inches, the fairy has a minute humanoid body, head, and limbs but sports large insect like wings, which may be transparent or multi-colored, according to type."

"The fairy possesses a weak brand of magic that it may use to deter predators, such as an Augurey. it has a quarrelsome nature but, being excessively vain, it will become docile in any occasion when called to act as an ornament. Despite it’s humanlike appearance, the fairy cannot speak. it makes a high pitched buzzing noise to communicate with its fellows."

"The fairy lays up to fifty eggs at a time on the underside of leaves. The eggs hatch into brightly colored larvae. At the age of six to ten days these spin themselves a cocoon, from which they emerge one month later as fully formed winged adults."

-Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them

It’s a huge dream of mine to work on the “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” movie trilogy. I’ve been trying to draw some beasts from the book lately in hopes that sharing them may lead me to doing some design work on the films. This prospect is really exciting to me, so expect more creature drawings from me. I hope you enjoy.  :) 

Audrey Benjaminsen 2014

castingcallwoe:

This role may require you to touch raw meat & look like you enjoy it.

becausebirds:

just-a-dori-able:

bc why not chickens in jewelry? For all photos look here

Chickens with more fashion sense than most of us.

theoddmentemporium:

Bridget Cleary, Fairy Changeling
Bridget Cleary was an Irish woman who, in 1895, was killed by her husband who believed she was a fairy changeling. In folklore a changeling is a fairy which is switched with a human infant. In many cases a changeling seemed like the only rational explanation for the unknown diseases etc., which might afflict a child.
Although her age, for she was 26 at the time, perhaps makes Bridget’s case unique, it was with such illness that her troubles began. She lay in bed with a fever for over a week, going undiagnosed by her physician and believed sufficiently ill enough to have a priest administer the last rites, before her husband and father declared her to be a changeling. In a curious ritual, aimed at expelling the fairy from her body, they doused her in urine and sat her before the fireplace.
A few days later she went missing. Her husband reiterated his belief that she had been taken by fairies, however, Bridget’s burnt remains were soon found nearby in a shallow grave. Evidence suggested that, as the Cleary family gathered at Bridget’s sick bed, an argument, tinged with fairy mythology, had erupted, and Bridget had offended her husband by telling him the only person who had gone off with the fairies had been his mother. This escalated into him menacing his wife with a flaming stick, which ignited her chemise. He then threw an oil lamp on her, all the while claiming that she was a changeling and that he would, by these means, get his wife back. 
He was convicted of manslaughter, though some believe he concocted a ‘fairy defence’ after Bridget’s murder so he might get a lesser sentence. Nine other people were also charged for their involvement in the murder, demonstrating how widely believed fairy folklore was amongst these rural Irish communities at the time.
[Sources: Changeling | Bridget Cleary | Galway Advertiser | See Also]

theoddmentemporium:

Bridget Cleary, Fairy Changeling

Bridget Cleary was an Irish woman who, in 1895, was killed by her husband who believed she was a fairy changeling. In folklore a changeling is a fairy which is switched with a human infant. In many cases a changeling seemed like the only rational explanation for the unknown diseases etc., which might afflict a child.

Although her age, for she was 26 at the time, perhaps makes Bridget’s case unique, it was with such illness that her troubles began. She lay in bed with a fever for over a week, going undiagnosed by her physician and believed sufficiently ill enough to have a priest administer the last rites, before her husband and father declared her to be a changeling. In a curious ritual, aimed at expelling the fairy from her body, they doused her in urine and sat her before the fireplace.

A few days later she went missing. Her husband reiterated his belief that she had been taken by fairies, however, Bridget’s burnt remains were soon found nearby in a shallow grave. Evidence suggested that, as the Cleary family gathered at Bridget’s sick bed, an argument, tinged with fairy mythology, had erupted, and Bridget had offended her husband by telling him the only person who had gone off with the fairies had been his mother. This escalated into him menacing his wife with a flaming stick, which ignited her chemise. He then threw an oil lamp on her, all the while claiming that she was a changeling and that he would, by these means, get his wife back.

He was convicted of manslaughter, though some believe he concocted a ‘fairy defence’ after Bridget’s murder so he might get a lesser sentence. Nine other people were also charged for their involvement in the murder, demonstrating how widely believed fairy folklore was amongst these rural Irish communities at the time.

[Sources: Changeling | Bridget Cleary | Galway Advertiser | See Also]

solongasitswords:

velvetqueer:

uhmwillowsomething:

huesosmccoy:

why do people say “don’t be a pussy” when talking about weakness more like “don’t be a man’s ego” because you know there isn’t nothing more fragile than that

uh 

because “pussy” is the shortened form of the word “pusillanimous”, which means “timid, cowardly”

and not the slang word for the female genital region?

literally no one else knows this. nobody. 

LITERALLY NO ONE KNOWS THIS BECAUSE IT IS NOT TRUE

It means you’re acting like a tame housecat, a pet. See the OED:

image

image

The first instance of ‘pussy’ to mean vagina is also in a slightly cat-like context (‘my pussy had fed’) but I’m not sure if that’s coincidence as the other usages aren’t as clear.